Backyard birds Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Christian Gavin

Welcome to my gallery
There are many varieties of birds in North America; in fact, there are more 630 species in Canada, and the U.S.A. Chances are, many of those species can be seen in your own backyard. If you can meet their basic needs, such as food, and water some of these birds can be attracted to your backyard, and who knows, establish permanent residence.

Northern female Cardinal on snow
Northern female Cardinal on snow
American yellow warbler
American yellow warbler
Barred owl
Barred owl
Dark eyed junco
Dark eyed junco
Winter wren
Winter wren
American goldfinch
American goldfinch
Hermit Thrush
Hermit Thrush
Sparrow
Sparrow
Black-Capped Chickadee on a branch
Black-Capped Chickadee on a branch
Northern male Cardinal on the ground
Northern male Cardinal on the ground
House finch female
House finch female
American Robin
American Robin


Backyard birds Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Northern female Cardinal on snow. The northern cardinal (cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as common cardinal. The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). The Northern cardinal has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull red-brown shade.

Photo 2. American yellow warbler. The American yellow warbler (Setophaga petechia, formerly Dendroica petechia) is a New World warbler species. Sensu lato, they make up the most widespread species in the diverse Setophaga genus, breeding in almost the whole of North America and down to northern South America.

Photo 3. Barred owl. The barred owl (Strix varia) is a large typical owl native to North America. Best known as the hoot owl for its distinctive call, it goes by many other names, including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl. Breeding habitats are dense woods across Canada, the eastern United States, and south to Mexico.

Photo 4. Dark eyed junco. The dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) is the best-known species of the juncos, a genus of small grayish American sparrows. This bird is common across much of temperate North America and in summer ranges far into the Arctic. It is a very variable species, much like the related fox sparrow (Passerella iliaca), and its systematics are still not completely untangled. Adults generally have gray heads, necks, and breasts, gray or brown backs and wings, and a white belly.

Photo 5. Winter wren. The winter wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) is a very small North American bird, and a member of the mainly New World wren family Troglodytidae. It breeds in coniferous forests from British Columbia to the Atlantic Ocean. It migrates through and winters across southeastern Canada, the eastern half the United States and (rarely) north-eastern Mexico. Small numbers may be casual in the western United States and Canada.

Photo 6. American goldfinch. The American goldfinch (Spinus tristis), also known as the eastern goldfinch, is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadian border to Mexico during the winter. The American goldfinch is a granivore and adapted for the consumption of seedheads, with a conical beak to remove the seeds and agile feet to grip the stems of seedheads while feeding.

Photo 7. Hermit Thrush. The hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus) is a medium-sized North American thrush. It is not very closely related to the other North American migrant species of Catharus, but rather to the Mexican russet nightingale-thrush. Their breeding habitat is coniferous or mixed woods across Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern and western United States.

Photo 8. Sparrow. The white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) is a passerine bird of the American sparrow family Emberizidae. There are two adult plumage variations known as the tan-striped, and white-striped forms; the one on this image is of tan morph. The two color morphs occur in approximately equal numbers. Both male and female white-striped birds are more aggressive than tan-striped birds during the breeding season. White-throated sparrows breed in central Canada and New England.

Photo 9. Black-Capped Chickadee on a branch. The black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is a small, nonmigratory, North American song bird, that lives in deciduous forests. It is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. The

Photo 10. Northern male Cardinal on the ground. The northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as common cardinal. The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). The Northern cardinal has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull red-brown shade.

Photo 11. House finch female. The house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is found in North America, where its range has increased since the mid-twentieth century, and in the islands of Hawaii. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous by the American Ornithologists' Union but have usually been included in Carpodacus.

Photo 12. American Robin. The American robin is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. The American robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering from southern Canada to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. The American robin ranks among one of the most abundant, land bird in North America. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin.