Birds of the world Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Ian Watts

This gallery contains pictures of birds of all types. Some are wild, some in captivity and some kept as pets. Birds are very fascinating creatures; graceful but in some cases extremely brutal. Many are exceptionally beautiful with very colourful plumage and lovely bird songs. To watch a bird flying is to witness a miracle of nature.

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Birds - Mute Swan
Birds - Mute Swan
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Birds - Mute Swan
Birds - Mute Swan
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Birds


Birds of the world Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Birds. The head of a quite mature female golden eagle. This is a very intelligent bird with strong, penetrating stare. It's colouring was quite beautiful. The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes.

Photo 2. Birds. The peregrine falcon is a truly magnificent bird. He is capable of straight line speeds up to 200 miles an hour. Young peregrine falcons have brownish feathers which gradually turned bluey grey when they reach maturity. This is a picture of a fully mature bird with really beautiful markings on the underside of its wings and its chest.

Photo 3. Birds. The great grey owl or great gray owl (Strix nebulosa) is a very large owl, documented as the world's largest species of owl by length. It is distributed across the Northern Hemisphere. In some areas it is also called Phantom of the North, cinereous owl, spectral owl, Lapland owl, spruce owl, bearded owl, and sooty owl. Adults have a large rounded head with a grey face and yellow eyes with darker circles around them. The underparts are light with dark streaks; the upper parts are grey

Photo 4. Birds. The tawny owl or brown owl (Strix aluco) is a stocky, medium-sized owl commonly found in woodlands across much of Eurasia. Its underparts are pale with dark streaks, and the upper parts are either brown or grey. Several of the eleven recognised subspecies have both variants. The nest is typically in a tree hole where it can protect its eggs and young against potential predators. This owl is non-migratory and highly territorial. Many young birds starve if they cannot find a vacant territor

Photo 5. Birds. A golden eagle sitting proudly on a log. You can see the power of this bird in its wings and legs. it's claws or talons are frightening to look at and remind you of the raptors from dinosaur times. The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes.

Photo 6. Birds. This photograph shows a barn owl at the moment it takes off from a tree stump. The owl has its wings unfurled and is using its short but powerful legs to launch itself into the air. The barn owl (Tyto alba) is the most widely distributed species of owl, and one of the most widespread of all birds.

Photo 7. Birds - Mute Swan. Swans are the largest members of the waterfowl family Anatidae, and are among the largest flying birds. Mute swans such as the one in the photograph, are among the largest of the swans and can be found all over the northern hemisphere. In the UK swans are considered to be the monarch's birds and it is against the law to hunt or kill them.

Photo 8. Birds. The peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), also known as the peregrine, and historically as the duck hawk in North America, is a widespread bird of prey in the family Falconidae. A large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head. As is typical of bird-eating raptors, peregrine falcons are sexually dimorphic, females being considerably larger than males. The peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 322 km/h (200 mph) during its character

Photo 9. Birds. The tawny owl or brown owl (Strix aluco) is a stocky, medium-sized owl commonly found in woodlands across much of Eurasia. Its underparts are pale with dark streaks, and the upperparts are either brown or grey. Several of the eleven recognised subspecies have both variants. The nest is typically in a tree hole where it can protect its eggs and young against potential predators. This owl is non-migratory and highly territorial. Many young birds starve if they cannot find a vacant territory

Photo 10. Birds. This barn owl was standing on the floor of the forest and it's easy to see how its colouring blends into the background as camouflage.The owl never stops watching you but didn't make any attempt to fly away. The barn owl (Tyto alba) is the most widely distributed species of owl, and one of the most widespread of all birds.

Photo 11. Birds - Mute Swan. Swans are the largest members of the waterfowl family Anatidae, and are among the largest flying birds. Mute swans such as the one in the photograph, are among the largest of the swans and can be found all over the northern hemisphere. In the UK swans are considered to be the monarch's birds and it is against the law to hunt or kill them. This bevy of swans was on a canal in Bruges Belgium.

Photo 12. Birds. This barn owl was quite happy to sit on this tree stump, not at all afraid of humans. The barn owl (Tyto alba) is the most widely distributed species of owl, and one of the most widespread of all birds. It is also referred to as the common barn owl, to distinguish it from other species in its family, Tytonidae, which forms one of the two main lineages of living owls, the other being the typical owls (Strigidae).