Cobbold Gorge Cruise Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Brigitte Seidl

Cobbold Gorge is one of the gems along the Savannah Way from Cairns to Broome. It is located app 90 km south of Georgetown. The Gorge was form 134 million years ago through sedimentation of the Hampstead Sandstone. Torrential wet seasons spilled torrents of water through the narrow ravines carving out deep gorges with permanent waterholes and breathtaking sandstone cliffs. Cruising the Gorge is a fantastic way exploring the stunning scenery, diverse flora and fauna and rich cultural history. Cob

Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise
Cobbold Gorge Cruise


Cobbold Gorge Cruise Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Deep in the heart of the Gulf Savannah region of Far North Queensland is a hidden outback oasis - Cobbold Gorge. Immerse yourself in the natural wonder of a truly unique North Queensland outback holiday destination.

Photo 2. Travel by sealed road from Cairns, west along the Kennedy Highway through the picturesque Atherton Tableland to Mount Garnet. From here, the famous Savannah Way continues via the Gulf Developmental Road to Mt Surprise and then onto Georgetown. From Georgetown, head south to Forsayth. Of the 42 kilometres of road between Georgetown and Forsayth there are only 14 kilometres unsealed, with a further 43km of formed gravel road from Forsayth to Cobbold Village.

Photo 3. You also may choose to stay in the nearby Gulf Savannah towns of Georgetown, Mount Surprise, Einasleigh or Forsayth, drive out for the day and join an expert guided tour to experience the magnificent Cobbold Gorge.

Photo 4. There's no better way to grasp the uniqueness of the narrow gorge with its majestic, 30-metre sheer walls than to get up-close-and-personal with it. The three hour walk/cruise tour includes a walk to the grave of pioneer John Corbett and a boat cruise, an unforgettable highlight of your trip to outback Queensland along the Savannah Way.

Photo 5. The cruise is on custom-made, electric powered boats which glide through the water in almost eerie silence ensuring minimal disturbance to wildlife. There's every chance of seeing one of the large population of resident freshwater crocodiles.

Photo 6. Cobbold Gorge is a natural playground and relaxation sanctuary. Cobbold Gorge has earned a reputation as a 'must see' North Queensland outback destination, with visitors often telling us they wish they had allowed more time!

Photo 7. In the Gulf Savannah the dry season brings cool, crisp mornings and cloudless skies — perfect conditions for bushwalking, birdwatching, boat cruises, canoeing and exploring the amazing natural wonders and wildlife of Cobbold Gorge.

Photo 8. Getting off the beaten track of the Gulf Savannah Way doesn't mean sacrificing comfort or convenience with your accommodation. Cobbold Gorge offers accommodation options and rates to suit every group and budget. A great way to end a perfect day, gather 'round the campfire at night to meet new friends.

Photo 9. Gulf Savannah region can be very rewarding for North Queensland birdwatchers, particularly in the dry season when birds congregate around water holes in the early morning and late afternoon. More than 100 bird species have been recorded at Cobbold Gorge. These include a variety of birds of prey, herons, ibis, honeyeaters, cormorants, flycatchers, cockatoos, pigeons, finches, ducks, parrots and many more.

Photo 10. Around 20 species of native mammals have been recorded around Cobbold Gorge including koalas, short-beaked echidnas, brush tail possums, red kangaroos and swamp wallabies. Most commonly-seen are grey kangaroos and wallaroos.

Photo 11. Reptiles are often spotted sunning themselves in the winter months including skinks, geckos, dragons, monitors and snakes. The deadliest species are the northern death adders and eastern brown snakes; while the orange-naped snakes, black-headed pythons, keelbacks and tree snakes are harmless.

Photo 12. Large populations of freshwater crocodiles and turtles can be found in the gorge and other permanent waterholes, as are many fish species such as archer fish, banded grunter, eel-tailed catfish, sleepy cod and black bream. Other aquatic species include freshwater prawns and redclaw yabbiesCobbold Gorge Cruise.