Ancient Bee Keeping museum. Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Mel Beasley

The Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping (Senovinės bitininkystės muziejus), established in 1984 near Stripeikiai in northeastern Lithuania, displays the history of beekeeping in the area. The museum, part of Aukštaitija National Park, was founded by the beekeeper Bronius Kazlas. Sculptured hives at the museum As of 2006, the museum consisted of six buildings, about 500 displays, and 25 sculptures. In addition to illustrating the history of beekeeping in Lithuania, some of the museum

Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping
Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping


Ancient Bee Keeping museum. Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Every public place must have a toilet and this little rustic construction serves that purpose at the museum.

Photo 2. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Carved figures near the entrance, it seems to be a picture telling a story, the animal is an ox and its pulling the man and a plough, or plow perhaps the head at the top of the post is a God looking over the hard working man.

Photo 3. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Entrance to the museum of ancient beekeeping. I'm struck by the lack of both security and vandalism, perhaps these pagan wooden figures keep it safe?

Photo 4. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. A river runs through the beekeeping museum adding to the natural tranquility of the place. Wooden figures are to be seen on both sides of its banks,

Photo 5. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Carved wooden figures of a man and a woman, gaze at a bucket on the ground between them as if waiting for it to do something wonderful by itself. The building behind them is probably supposed to represent their cottage. To the left appears to be a similar shine and maybe a totem pole, though it may be a street light.

Photo 6. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. This carved wooden figure appears to be a crone or hag, she is holding a crude broom, which is still used today, it may be symbolic of cleaning away evil spirits, or she may simply keep the hives and buildings clean.

Photo 7. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. This little house which is no bigger than a garden shed, contained some hives, to it's left is some kind of shrine.

Photo 8. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Two carved wooden figures, one is a man draped in rope and carrying an unidentified object, the other figure is female, probably a child. The carvings are very naïve but with their own charm.

Photo 9. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. This carved, wooden, female figure holds out a plate on which have been left small offerings of coins.

Photo 10. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. Carved wooden figure climbing the tree stump, which has a roof at the top, on which is a symbol of the Sun. There is an obvious pagan, spiritual significance to this and other carvings on site. Obviously the Sun was and is essential to the bees in the making of honey and honey in the form of mead has long been considered a holy drink amongst pagan folk.

Photo 11. Lithuanian Museum of Ancient Beekeeping. One of many wooden figures on site, it is an old folk art, pagan,

Photo 12. Required