Architecture Photography

Stock Stock Images By Robert Baillie

Various examples of Architecture from around the world



Architecture Details

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Photo Count: 34

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Caption List:

1. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood, St Petersburg. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood was built on the exact spot where Tsar Alexander II was fatally wounded in 1881. The church was built from 1883 to 1907 and was funded by the royal family. It was dedicated as a memorial to the father of the then reigning monarch Alexander III. The interior is a museum of mosaics, as all the icons are made of mosaic tiles. It is definitely one of the most photographed landmarks of St. Petersburg, as its colourful domes appear in many travel brochures on

2. Spiral Staircase. Spiral staircases started out made of stone, like the ones in the medieval castles and those found in lighthouses, but modern materials and technology have paved the way for the most beautiful versions in wood, metal, or a combination of both. Through the centuries the spiral staircase has become all about the customization to fit exactly the style, form, and function desired. The incredible photographic designs that can be captured produce results similar to the structure of the nautilus shell.

3. Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes, France. The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes or the Domain, as it is most commonly known, is an area of ground surrounding the Catholic shrine (Grotto) to Our Lady of Lourdes in the town of Lourdes, France. The Sanctuary is a destination for pilgrimage; sick pilgrims are reputed to be miraculously healed by Lourdes water. This ground is owned and administrated by the Roman Catholic Church, and has several functions, including devotional activities, offices, and accommodation for sick pilgrims and their

4. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. Tallinn is the capital and largest city of Estonia. It is situated on the northern coast of the country, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, 80 km (50 mi) south of Helsinki, east of Stockholm and west of Saint Petersburg in Harju County. From the 13th century until 1918 (and briefly during the Nazi occupation of Estonia from 1941 to 1944), the city was known as Reval. The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox cathedral in the Tallinn Old Town, Estonia. It was built to a design by Mikhail Pr

5. Kinkaku-ji, Golden Pavilion, Kyoto. Kinkaku-ji (literally "Temple of the Golden Pavilion"), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most popular buildings in Japan, attracting a large number of visitors annually. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site and a National Special Landscape, and it is one of 17 locations making up the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which are World Heritage Sites.

6. Spiral Staircase. Spiral staircases started out made of stone, like the ones in the medieval castles and those found in lighthouses, but modern materials and technology have paved the way for the most beautiful versions in wood, metal, or a combination of both. Through the centuries the spiral staircase has become all about the customization to fit exactly the style, form, and function desired. The incredible photographic designs that can be captured produce results similar to the structure of the nautilus shell.

7. St Colmans Cathedral Cobh Ireland. Cobh, known from 1849 until 1920 as Queenstown, is a tourist seaport town on the south coast of County Cork, Ireland. Cobh is on the south side of Great Island in Cork Harbour and is home to Ireland's only dedicated cruise terminal. Tourism in the area draws on the maritime and emigration legacy of the town - including its association with the RMS Titanic. Cobh, known from 1849 until 1920 as Queenstown, is a tourist seaport town on the south coast of County Cork, Ireland. Cobh is on the

8. Spiral Staircase. Spiral staircases started out made of stone, like the ones in the medieval castles and those found in lighthouses, but modern materials and technology have paved the way for the most beautiful versions in wood, metal, or a combination of both. Through the centuries the spiral staircase has become all about the customization to fit exactly the style, form, and function desired. The incredible photographic designs that can be captured produce results similar to the structure of the nautilus shell.

9. Cathedral of Messina Italy. The Cathedral of Messina. Built during Norman time, it was consecrated by the Archbishop Berardo in 1197, in the presence of Emperor Henry VI of Swabia and Queen Constance of Hauteville. Its history has been turbulent and it has been destroyed and rebuilt several times over the centuries. Messina is the capital of the Italian Metropolitan City of Messina. It is the 3rd largest city on the island of Sicily, and the 13th largest city in Italy, with a population of more than 238,000 inhabitants i

10. Spiral Staircase. Spiral staircases started out made of stone, like the ones in the medieval castles and those found in lighthouses, but modern materials and technology have paved the way for the most beautiful versions in wood, metal, or a combination of both. Through the centuries the spiral staircase has become all about the customization to fit exactly the style, form, and function desired. The incredible photographic designs that can be captured produce results similar to the structure of the nautilus shell.

11. Detail form St Marks Church Venice. Piazza San Marco, often known in English as St Mark's Square, is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is generally known just as la Piazza ("the Square"). All other urban spaces in the city (except the Piazzetta and the Piazzale Roma) are called campi ("fields"). The Piazzetta ("little Piazza/Square") is an extension of the Piazza towards the lagoon in its south east corner. The Square is dominated at its eastern end

12. Rialto Bridge Venice Italy. The Rialto Bridge is one of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. It is the oldest bridge across the canal, and was the dividing line for the districts of San Marco and San Polo.

13. Gondolas and Bridges Venice Italy. The gondola is a traditional, flat-bottomed Venetian rowing boat, well suited to the conditions of the Venetian lagoon. It is similar to a canoe, except it is narrower. It is propelled by a gondolier, who uses a rowing oar, which is not fastened to the hull, in a sculling manner and acts as the rudder. For centuries, the gondola was the chief means of transportation and most common watercraft within Venice. In modern times, the iconic boats still do have a role in public transport in the city, s

14. Bruges Town Centre Belgium. Bruges is the capital and largest city of the province of West Flanders in the Flemish Region of Belgium, in the northwest of the country. The historic city centre is a prominent World Heritage Site of UNESCO. It is oval and about 430 hectares in size. Along with a few other canal-based northern cities, such as Amsterdam and Stockholm, it is sometimes referred to as The Venice of the North. Bruges has a significant economic importance thanks to its port and was once one of the world's ch

15. Piazza della Republblica Florence Italy. Piazza della Repubblica is a city square in Florence, Italy. It is on the site, first of the city's forum and then of the city's old ghetto, which was swept away during the city improvement works or Risanamento initiated during the brief period when Florence was the capital of a reunited Italy, work that also created the city's avenues and boulevards.

16. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral. Tallinn is the capital and largest city of Estonia. It is situated on the northern coast of the country, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, 80 km (50 mi) south of Helsinki, east of Stockholm and west of Saint Petersburg in Harju County. From the 13th century until 1918 (and briefly during the Nazi occupation of Estonia from 1941 to 1944), the city was known as Reval. The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox cathedral in the Tallinn Old Town, Estonia. It was built to a design by Mikhail Pr

17. Saint Martin Street, Caribbean. Saint Martin is an island in the northeast Caribbean, approximately 300 km (190 mi) east of Puerto Rico. The 87-square-kilometre (34 sq mi) island is divided roughly 60/40 between the French Republic and the Kingdom of the Netherlands but the two parts are roughly equal in population, with slightly more people living on the Dutch side. It is the smallest inhabited island divided between two nations. The division dates to 1648. The southern Dutch part comprises Sint Maarten and is one of four con

18. Peter and Paul Fortress, St Petersburg, Russia. Peter and Paul Fortress is on Zayachi Island, St Petersburg, Russia. The gold cathedral spire can be seen from various places in the city. At 123 meters from the ground to the top of the spire, it can be considered the tallest Orthodox church in the world. Its bell tower is definitely the tallest Orthodox bell tower in the world. All tsars, tsarinas and emperors from Peter the Great to Nicholas II (the last tsar) are buried within the cathedral, except two – one of whom was bu

19. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood, St Petersburg. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood was built on the exact spot where Tsar Alexander II was fatally wounded in 1881. The church was built from 1883 to 1907 and was funded by the royal family. It was dedicated as a memorial to the father of the then reigning monarch Alexander III. The interior is a museum of mosaics, as all the icons are made of mosaic tiles. It is definitely one of the most photographed landmarks of St. Petersburg, as its colourful domes appear in many travel brochures on

20. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood, St Petersburg. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood was built on the exact spot where Tsar Alexander II was fatally wounded in 1881. The church was built from 1883 to 1907 and was funded by the royal family. It was dedicated as a memorial to the father of the then reigning monarch Alexander III. The interior is a museum of mosaics, as all the icons are made of mosaic tiles. It is definitely one of the most photographed landmarks of St. Petersburg, as its colourful domes appear in many travel brochures on

21. Saint Isaac's Cathedral, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Saint Isaac's Cathedral or Isaakievskiy Sobor in Saint Petersburg, Russia, is the largest Russian Orthodox cathedral (sobor) in the city. It is the largest orthodox basilica and the fourth largest (by the volume under the cupola) cathedral in the world. It is dedicated to Saint Isaac of Dalmatia, a patron saint of Peter the Great, who had been born on the feast day of that saint.

22. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood, St Petersburg. The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood was built on the exact spot where Tsar Alexander II was fatally wounded in 1881. The church was built from 1883 to 1907 and was funded by the royal family. It was dedicated as a memorial to the father of the then reigning monarch Alexander III. The interior is a museum of mosaics, as all the icons are made of mosaic tiles. It is definitely one of the most photographed landmarks of St. Petersburg, as its colourful domes appear in many travel brochures on

23. Peter and Paul Fortress, St Petersburg, Russia. Peter and Paul Fortress is on Zayachi Island, St Petersburg, Russia. The gold cathedral spire can be seen from various places in the city. At 123 meters from the ground to the top of the spire, it can be considered the tallest Orthodox church in the world. Its bell tower is definitely the tallest Orthodox bell tower in the world. All tsars, tsarinas and emperors from Peter the Great to Nicholas II (the last tsar) are buried within the cathedral, except two – one of whom was bu

24. Pagoda at Mount Inasa, Nagasaki, Japan. Pagoda at Mount Inasa. Mount Inasa is a hill to the west of Nagasaki which rises to a height of 333 metres (1,093 ft). The Nagasaki Ropeway allows visitors to travel to the top from Nagasaki. A short walk from the cable car station are several buildings that house transmitters for TV and radio stations that serve Nagasaki and the surrounding area. There is an observation platform that is popular with tourists as it provides spectacular views of Nagasaki's "10 Million Dollar Nigh

25. Kinkaku-ji, Golden Pavilion, Kyoto. Kinkaku-ji (literally "Temple of the Golden Pavilion"), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most popular buildings in Japan, attracting a large number of visitors annually. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site and a National Special Landscape, and it is one of 17 locations making up the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which are World Heritage Sites.

26. Clock Tower, Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores. Ponta Delgada is the largest municipality and administrative capital of the Autonomous Region of the Azores in Portugal. It is located on São Miguel Island, the largest and most populous in the archipelago. There are three central civil parishes that comprise the historical city: São Pedro, São Sebastião, and São José. Ponta Delgada became the region's administrative capital under the revised constitution of 1976.

27. State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia. The State Hermitage Museum is a museum of art and culture in Saint Petersburg, Russia. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1754 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852. Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, comprise over three million items including the largest collection of paintings in the world. The collections occupy a large complex of six historic buildings along Palace Embankment, including the Wint

28. Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes, France. The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes or the Domain, as it is most commonly known, is an area of ground surrounding the Catholic shrine (Grotto) to Our Lady of Lourdes in the town of Lourdes, France. The Sanctuary is a destination for pilgrimage; sick pilgrims are reputed to be miraculously healed by Lourdes water. This ground is owned and administrated by the Roman Catholic Church, and has several functions, including devotional activities, offices, and accommodation for sick pilgrims and their

29. State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia. The State Hermitage Museum is a museum of art and culture in Saint Petersburg, Russia. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1754 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852. Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, comprise over three million items including the largest collection of paintings in the world. The collections occupy a large complex of six historic buildings along Palace Embankment, including the Wint

30. State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia. The State Hermitage Museum is a museum of art and culture in Saint Petersburg, Russia. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1754 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852. Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, comprise over three million items including the largest collection of paintings in the world. The collections occupy a large complex of six historic buildings along Palace Embankment, including the Wint

31. Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin. The Ha'penny Bridge, known later for a time as the Penny Ha'penny Bridge, and officially the Liffey Bridge, is a pedestrian bridge built in May 1816 over the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. Made of cast iron, the bridge was cast at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire, England. Originally called the Wellington Bridge (after the Dublin-born Duke of Wellington), the name of the bridge changed to Liffey Bridge. The Liffey Bridge remains the bridge's official name to this day, althou

32. Copenhagen Harbour. Copenhagen is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. The city is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund. The Øresund Bridge connects the two cities by rail and road. Originally a Viking fishing village founded in the 10th century, Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark in the early 15th century. Beginning in the 17th cen

33. Copenhagen Architecture. Copenhagen is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. The city is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund. The Øresund Bridge connects the two cities by rail and road. Originally a Viking fishing village founded in the 10th century, Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark in the early 15th century. Beginning in the 17th cen

34. Shopping Centre Oranjestad Aruba. Aruba is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in the southern Caribbean Sea, located about 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) west of the main part of the Lesser Antilles and 29 kilometres (18 mi) north of the coast of Venezuela. It measures 32 kilometres (20 mi) long from its north western to its south eastern end and 10 kilometres (6 mi) across at its widest point. Together with Bonaire and Curaçao, Aruba forms a group referred to as the ABC islands. Aruba is one of the fo

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