Marrakesh - Traditional Morocco Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Heather Farish

The most popular destination to visit in Morocco, when wandering the medina, at times it is like stepping back hundreds of years. Goods hammered and stitched by hand, spices pile in tall cones, donkeys used to transport goods and lampshades made out of goat skin. Here is a taste.

Spice cones
Spice cones
Main square in Marrakesh
Main square in Marrakesh
Marrakesh water carrier
Marrakesh water carrier
Moroccan carpets
Moroccan carpets
Mosque door detail
Mosque door detail
Stucco or carved plasterwork
Stucco or carved plasterwork
Ben Youssef Medersa, Marrakesh
Ben Youssef Medersa, Marrakesh
Saadien Tombs, Marrakesh
Saadien Tombs, Marrakesh
Basket seller in Marrakesh
Basket seller in Marrakesh
Marrakesh alley
Marrakesh alley
Bahia Palace ceiling detail
Bahia Palace ceiling detail
Door at the Bahia Palace, Marrakesh
Door at the Bahia Palace, Marrakesh


Marrakesh - Traditional Morocco Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Spices are everywhere in Morocco. Here in the medina in Marrakesh, as in others places in the country, the spices are piled high to form pointed cones.

Photo 2. One of the big attractions of Marrakesh, Morocco is the Djemaa el-Fna or main square where more than fifty food carts roll out each evening to set up food stalls like these.

Photo 3. These water carriers clad in red with large hats and a goat skin over their shoulder are a feature of the main square in Marrakesh. For a small fee you can get a drink of water in one of their metal cups or alternatively take a photograph.

Photo 4. Carpets are one of craft products for which Morocco is renowned. This selection was in the Marrakesh medina.

Photo 5. Door detail of the Mouassine mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Photo 6. Details of stucco or carved plasterwork at the Saadien Tombs in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Photo 7. The Ben Youssef Medersa, Marrakesh was once a Koranic school. Now restored, it displays stunning examples of stucco, or carved plasterwork.

Photo 8. In Morocco, the Saadien Tombs lay forgotten behind a mosque in Marrakesh for nearly 500 years and were only rediscovered in 1917.

Photo 9. One of the big attractions of Marrakesh, Morocco is the Djemaa el-Fna or main square where this woman was trying to sell her baskets.

Photo 10. All the buildings in Marrakesh are a red earth colour as shown in this medina alley.

Photo 11. Built in the late 1800s, the Bahia Palace in Marrakesh is a vast complex with many examples of traditional Moroccan craftsmanship. This photo shows the finely detailed, hand painting of the ceiling cedar beams in one room.

Photo 12. This is a hand painted door in the Bahai Palace.