Photogenic Nepal Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Heather Farish

Nepal is not just a trekkers delight but also a wonderful place for photographers with its temples and historic buildings, colourful festivals, traditional villages, friendly people and stunning mountain scenery. Here are a few to whet your appetite.

Buddha statue with candles
Buddha statue with candles
Portrait of older Nepali man
Portrait of older Nepali man
A Nepali woman standing
A Nepali woman standing
Rafting the Bhote Koshi in Nepal
Rafting the Bhote Koshi in Nepal
Nepali men at temple
Nepali men at temple
Samyak Festival in Patan
Samyak Festival in Patan
Nepali woman in Patan
Nepali woman in Patan
Patan Durbar Square
Patan Durbar Square
Nepali village house window
Nepali village house window
Tihar lights in Kathmandu
Tihar lights in Kathmandu
Patan temple through window
Patan temple through window
Windows of a Kathmandu Valley house
Windows of a Kathmandu Valley house


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Caption List:

Photo 1. Buddhism, along with Hinduism, are the two main religions that have merged in parts to give Nepal a religious character all its own.

Photo 2. There are many portrait opportunities in Nepal as the people are friendly, happy to talk to visitors and share their life.

Photo 3. Visiting rural villages gives the photographer the opportunity to learn about, and photography people, in their local setting.

Photo 4. Nepal is known for its adventure activities such as rafting, canyoning, kayaking, trekking and mountaineering.

Photo 5. Traditional dress can still be commonly seen, even on the streets of Kathmandu.

Photo 6. Many traditional celebrations also continue to be celebrated today. This is the Samyak Festival in Patan, Kathmandu where the statues come out of their temples.

Photo 7. The traditional Nepali scarf continues to serve many purposes, shade from the sun, an instrument to wipe away perspiration, additional warmth when it is cold and to protect the nose and mouth from the pollution when on the streets.

Photo 8. Patan Durbar Square has one of the largest collection of temples, both Buddhist and Hindu, in the Kathmandu Valley although temples are scattered all over the streets and through the villages.

Photo 9. Wooden shutters are the traditional window covering with leis of marigolds used throughout the year for celebrations or to welcome esteemed visitors.

Photo 10. Known as the Festival of Lights, Tihar is a time to celebrate and ensure good fortune for the following year. It is also a great opportunity for photographers.

Photo 11. Temples in all colours and designs depict the Nepali history through the ages. Most are still attended diligently by locals on a daily basis.

Photo 12. Agriculture is still the mainstay for most Nepalis. One floor of their houses is often given to storage of the produce for use later in the year.