Travelling Australia's Outback Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Heather Farish

Australia – the Outback, the Red Centre, the Never Never – descriptions of a remote, wild country outside the big cities. On a journey from Darwin to Adelaide travellers to experience Australia’s heart, where the spinifex dotted red earth dominates.
A land of cascading waterfalls with cooling plunge pools, carpets of colour clothe the barren earth after rain and rock formations such as monolithic Ayers Rock or the bizarre piles of the Devils Marbles. Travelling Australia's Outback.

Devils Marbles
Devils Marbles
Ayers Rock
Ayers Rock
Nabulwinjbulwinj at Kakadu National Park
Nabulwinjbulwinj at Kakadu National Park
Mataranka Falls
Mataranka Falls
Devils Marbles
Devils Marbles
Outback Australian road
Outback Australian road
Galah
Galah
Wetland reflections
Wetland reflections
A rock formation in the Breakaways Reserve
A rock formation in the Breakaways Reserve
Chambers Pillar
Chambers Pillar
Ewinga reflections
Ewinga reflections
Breakaways under stormy skies
Breakaways under stormy skies


Travelling Australia's Outback Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. South of Darwin, on the way to Alice Springs is a strange conglomeration of rocks called the Devils Marbles.

Photo 2. Ayers Rock is one of the most well-known natural attractions in Australia. On a flat plain, this huge monolith has even more underground. As the sun slowly sets, the rock gradually changes colour, making it an ideal subject and time for photographers to visit.

Photo 3. Nabulwinjbulwinj is a dangerous spirit who eats females after striking them with a yam and killing them. This depiction of Nabulwinjbulwinj is at Anbangbang Rock Shelter at Ubirr or Nourlangie Rock in Australia's Kakadu National Park.

Photo 4. South of Darwin, on the way to Alice Springs is the small town of Mataranka. Along the banks of the Roper River, Elsey National Park is located in which the small but pretty Mataranka Falls are found.

Photo 5. Like the large rock further south, the ideal time to view the Devils Marbles is at sunrise or sunset as they glow in shades of orange, yellow and brown.

Photo 6. Outback Australian road in South Australia, north of Coober Pedy.

Photo 7. The galah is one of the many colourful birds seen in Australia, with many of them being seen in outback Australia including the Red Centre.

Photo 8. World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park in Australia's Northern Territory, is home to some of the countries most spectacular wetlands. The Yellow Water wetlands are home to at least 60 species of birds including the Magpie Goose, jacana, jabiru, ibis and ducks. Paperbark forest edge the wetlands. They are best seen either on a cruise or on one of the walking tracks.

Photo 9. The Breakaways Reserve, north of Coober Pedy in South Australia, is an area of dramatic outback desert scenery. It is a collection of flat-topped mesas in a range of colours on a flat gibber desert plain.

Photo 10. Chambers Pillar is a bizarre sandstone rock formation found in central Australia, about 160 kilometres south of Alice Springs. The drive to reach it provides a fascinating insight into the desert of this region.

Photo 11. Ewinga is a region between Alice Springs and Chambers Pillar to the south. Driving by as storm clouds scuttled overhead produced these striking reflections in a pool at Ewinga.

Photo 12. The Breakaways Reserve, north of Coober Pedy in South Australia, is an area of dramatic outback desert scenery especially under stormy skies. So much so that it has been used for the setting of a number of movies including Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome and Priscilla Queen of the Desert.