A Step Back in Time Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By David McCreary

Join me for a journey through the late part of the 1800s, when time moved a bit slower. No TV, no computers, no cell phones (WHAT?) to interrupt the leisurely way of living. That is not to say that life was easy because it certainly was not. The main struggle was just to stay alive and as a result people depended on each other. Raising crops and kids was a lot of work but still there was plenty of time for friends and family. Today we have a lot time saving stuff, so where did the time go

Railroad Tracks
Railroad Tracks
Creedmoore rifle sight
Creedmoore rifle sight
Active Water Wheel
Active Water Wheel
Merlins House
Merlins House
Gun barrel fire
Gun barrel fire
Livery Stable
Livery Stable
Steel Wash Tubs
Steel Wash Tubs
Goats
Goats
Hawken rifle cap lock and trigger guard
Hawken rifle cap lock and trigger guard
Old Loom
Old Loom


A Step Back in Time Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Ever since the golden spike was driven, railroad tracks have woven a web of economical transport across America. Projected to be supplanted by both the automobile and airplane, trains have at first steamed then chugged and now zip along, defying oblivion. Here an abandon rail yard is reclaimed by vegetation as will occur to anything relinquished to natures care. The American railroad system still goes everywhere, it can take you there. All aboard!

Photo 2. This Goodwin Creedmoore rifle sight on my 45/70 is similar to one used during army tests in 1887. The gun was able to fire a black powder cartridge bullet through 4 inches of oak and 8 inches of sand behind it. The impressive fact is that this was done at a distance of one and a half miles.

Photo 3. I have run across functional water wheels in grain processing mills all over Southern Missouri. They sure make a quaint sight along rushing water. The one pictured is along side of a bakery, used to power mixers. This brings new meaning to water bread. Whoda thunk?

Photo 4. The hibiscus is prolific in my part of Arkansas. These tropical shrubs have beautiful flowers that range from 2 inches to 1 foot in size. Good drainage is essential for these perennials, as the roots will rot easily if left in soggy soil The Ph of the soil should be 6.0 to 7.0. They require high fertility in the soil to bloom well. Use a balanced fertilizer, such as 10-10-10.

Photo 5. When I saw this little dwelling I imagined Merlin lurking about inside with a few dragons milling about. This little chalet is to be found in south central Missouri at the Heritage Seed Company Pioneer Village.

Photo 6. This image was taken down the barrel of a 45 70 buffalo gun. The "fire" is sourced from a flashlight placed in the open receiver. Every time I look at this picture I imagine the wholesale slaughter of the American Bison. At on time it was reported a herd of bison so massive ,covering the plain as far as you could see and it took the herd more than an hour to pass by.

Photo 7. Livery Stable. Seeing this old livery stable, I just had to go inside to check out the livery I found no livery and detected nothing faintly resembling liver in any way (it usually has a distinct odor). I suppose that the livery had gone to the hay barn to improve their diet.

Photo 8. Wash tubs lined up on a rustic porch were a familiar sight around the turn of the 18th century. And to think that mom had to haul the water to fill them from down at the creek. Aint plumbing great?

Photo 9. Long ago but not so very far away, horsepower was literal. Horses were hitched to a myriad of conveyances to transport people to places they had never seen, far and wide. Stuff was also shuffled around to those people in places. Wagons and carts an surreys with fringe on top (for the more fortunate ones). However you cut it, the ride was a bumpy one for macadam was a thing of the future.

Photo 10. Meat markets were also a thing of the future in the 1800s. If you wanted meat you bartered or did the grow your own thing. Goats were ideal for growing your own, they would supply milk ( the girl kind anyway) and after they butted you in the butt to many times they would supply meat and some of the softest hides of all animals. I found these inquisitive goats at a pioneer village. When I approached to tighten the shot, the white one licked my lens.

Photo 11. This is my Lyman Hawken replica that I built. It is the gun that accompanied many westward migrants in the mid 1800s. Rugged and reliable, not only could it shoot, it could pry a wagon wheel loose from a mud hole. They are from a very simple design, easy to use and easy to work on.

Photo 12. Can you imagine spending days creating cloth for garments to clothe your family. Not only that but many weavers raised the sheep to get the wool to spin into thread to feed this behemoth. Makes shopping for clothing nowadays seem a lot less burdensome.