North American wildlife Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Christian Gavin

Hi everyone

This gallery is a mix of many things that can be found in the vast North American nature. North American wildlife gallery portrays, animals, and plants as well. Among the animals, you will see a variety of birds and mammals, all from our beautiful canadian and american forests,

Cooper's hawk eating
Cooper's hawk eating
Daylily flower
Daylily flower
White Easter Lily
White Easter Lily
Red fox reflection
Red fox reflection
Ring-billed gull
Ring-billed gull
Canada geese in flight
Canada geese in flight
Autumn reflection
Autumn reflection
Cedar waxwing
Cedar waxwing
Barred owl on a tree branch
Barred owl on a tree branch
Mallard female in flight
Mallard female in flight
Cottongrass against blue sky
Cottongrass against blue sky
Great Blue Heron reflexion
Great Blue Heron reflexion


North American wildlife Details

This Gallery Has Been Viewed Times



Caption List:

Photo 1. Cooper's hawk eating. Cooper's hawk is a medium-sized hawk, native to the North American continent. And as in many birds of prey, the male is smaller than the female. The average size of an adult male ranges from (7.8 to 15.5 oz) with a length between (14 and 18 in). The adult male is significantly smaller than the average female, which weigh (12 to 25 oz) and measure (17 to 20 in) long. These birds capture prey from cover, or while flying at high speed.

Photo 2. Daylily flower. Daylily is the common name for plants of the genus Hemerocallis. This flower is highly diverse in colour and form, as a result of hybridization efforts of professional horticulturalists. A normal, single daylily flower has three petals and three sepals, collectively called tepals.

Photo 3. White Easter Lily . Lilium longiflorum, often called the Easter lily, is a plant endemic to the Ryukyu Islands. In April-June the flowering season, the plant tends to grow from 20 inches to 3 feet, and produces pure white flowers on top of the stem.

Photo 4. Red fox reflection. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the largest of the true foxes and the most abundant member of the Carnivora. Apart from its large size, the red fox is distinguished from other fox species, by its ability to adapt quickly to new environments. Rabbits, game birds, reptiles, invertebrates compose most of its diet.

Photo 5. Ring-billed gull. Although their breeding habitat is near lakes, rivers or the coast in Canada and the northern United States. The ring-billed gull is a familiar sight in the shopping mall and parking lots, where it can regularly be found congregating in large numbers. These birds forage in flight or pick up objects while swimming, walking or wading. They also steal food from other birds and frequently scavenge.

Photo 6. Canada geese in flight. Canda goose usually begin to migrate to the south around September, to come back from the south end of March. They usually travel in flock, it is not rare to see more than fifty geese traveling together. Being a bird of large size, and traveling in such number make the Canada goose a no predator bird.

Photo 7. Autumn reflection. Beautiful colourful reflection, taken in a Canadian national park. Autumn leaf color is a phenomenon that affects the normally green leaves of many trees and shrubs. As a matter of fact, in some areas of Canada and the United States, "autumn colors season" tourism is a major contribution to economic activity.

Photo 8. Cedar waxwing. The cedar waxwing is a member of the family Bombycillidae or waxwing family of passerine birds. It's been named for its wax-like wing tips. Cedar waxwing is a native of North and Central America, and is not considered an endangered species.

Photo 9. Barred owl on a tree branch. The barred owl is a large typical owl native to North America. It also goes by many other names, including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl. It's breeding habitats are dense woods across Canada, the eastern United States, and south to Mexico; in recent years the barred owl has spread to the northwestern United States, having gradually spread farther south in the west. Barred owls may be partly responsible for the recent decline of the northern sp

Photo 10. Mallard female in flight. The plumage of the mallard female, is nothing compared to the males. The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head, and are grey on wings and belly. While the females have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are gregarious. Even if the female mallard enjoys the company of humans, this waterfowl can become very protective of their duclings at times.

Photo 11. Cottongrass against blue sky. Cottongrass or cottonsedge is a genus of flowering plants in the family Cyperaceae, the sedge family. The seed heads are covered in a fluffy mass of cotton which are carried on the wind to aid dispersal.

Photo 12. Great Blue Heron reflexion. This great blue heron was quietly resting in the water, when I walked by and took the shot. The great blue heron is a large wading bird, in the heron family Ardeidae. It is the largest North American heron and, among all extant herons. It has head-to-tail length of 91–137 cm (36–54 in), a wingspan of 167–201 cm (66–79 in), a height of 115–138 cm (45–54 in), and a weight of 1.82â