Andalusian Mare being trained by Spanish vaquero. Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Mel Beasley

My garage mechanic owns three Andalusian horses, this is one of them, a mare, being exercised and trained by his friend, a Spanish Vaquero, he chose her because I was there and she is more tranquil. I can supply further images if required and obtain details of the horse or horses.

Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.
Andalusian Mare training with a Spanish vaquero.


Andalusian Mare being trained by Spanish vaquero. Details

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Photo 1. The Andalusian, also known as the Pure Spanish Horse or PRE (Pura Raza Española), is a horse breed from the Iberian Peninsula, where its ancestors have lived for thousands of years. The Andalusian has been recognized as an individual breed since the 15th century, and its conformation has changed very little over the centuries. Throughout its history, it has been known for its prowess as a war horse, and was prized by the nobility.

Photo 2. The breed was used as a tool of diplomacy by the Spanish government, and kings across Europe rode and owned Spanish horses. During the 19th century, warfare, disease and crossbreeding reduced herd numbers dramatically, and despite some recovery in the late 19th century, the trend continued into the early 20th century. Exports of Andalusians from Spain were restricted until the 1960s, but the breed has since spread throughout the world, despite their low population. In 2010, there were more than

Photo 3. Strongly built, and compact yet elegant, Andalusians have long, thick manes and tails. Their most common coat color is gray, although they can be found in many other colors. They are known for their intelligence, sensitivity and docility. A sub-strain within the breed known as the Carthusian, is considered by breeders to be the purest strain of Andalusian, though there is no genetic evidence for this claim. The strain is still considered separate from the main breed however, and is preferred by

Photo 4. The Andalusian is closely related to the Lusitano of Portugal, and has been used to develop many other breeds, especially in Europe and the Americas. Breeds with Andalusian ancestry include many of the warmbloods in Europe as well as western hemisphere breeds such as the Azteca. Over its centuries of development, the Andalusian breed has been selected for athleticism and stamina. The horses were originally used for classical dressage, driving, bullfighting, and as stock horses. Modern Andalusian

Photo 5. Andalusians stallions and geldings average 15.1 1⁄2 hands (61.5 inches, 156 cm) at the withers and 512 kilograms (1,129 lb) in weight; mares average 15 1⁄2 hands (60.5 inches, 154 cm) and 412 kilograms (908 lb).[1] The Spanish government has set the minimum height for registration in Spain at 15.0 hands (60 inches, 152 cm) for males and 14.3 hands (59 inches, 150 cm) for mares - this standard is followed by the Association of Purebred Spanish Horse Breeders of Spain (Asociación Nacional de

Photo 6. Andalusian horses are elegant and strongly built. Members of the breed have heads of medium length, with a straight or slightly convex profile.[4] Ultra convex and concave profiles are discouraged in the breed, and are penalized in breed shows.[5] Necks are long and broad, running to well-defined withers and a massive chest. They have a short back and broad, strong hindquarters with a well-rounded croup. The breed tends to have clean legs, with no propensity for blemishes or injuries, and energe

Photo 7. There are two additional characteristics unique to the Carthusian strain, believed to trace back to the strain's foundation stallion Esclavo. The first is warts under the tail, a trait which Esclavo passed to his offspring, and a trait which some breeders felt was necessary to prove that a horse was a member of the Esclavo bloodline. The second characteristic is the occasional presence of "horns", which are frontal bosses, possibly inherited from Asian ancestors. The physical descr

Photo 8. In the past, most coat colors were found, including spotted patterns.[4] Today most Andalusians are gray or bay; in the US, around 80 percent of all Andalusians are gray. Of the remaining horses, approximately 15 percent are bay and 5 percent are black, dun or palomino or chestnut.[8] Other colors, such as buckskin, pearl, and cremello, are rare, but are recognized as allowed colors by registries for the breed

Photo 9. In the early history of the breed, certain white markings and whorls were considered to be indicators of character and good or bad luck.[11] Horses with white socks on their feet were considered to have good or bad luck, depending on the leg or legs marked. A horse with no white markings at all was considered to be ill-tempered and vice-ridden, while certain facial markings were considered representative of honesty, loyalty and endurance.[12] Similarly, hair whorls in various places were conside

Photo 10. The movement of Andalusian horses is extended, elevated, cadenced and harmonious, with a balance of roundness and forward movement. Poor elevation, irregular tempo, and excessive winging (sideways movement of the legs from the knee down) are discouraged by breed registry standards. Andalusians are known for their agility and their ability to learn difficult moves quickly, such as advanced collection and turns on the haunches.[5] A 2001 study compared the kinematic characteristics of Andalusian,

Photo 11. The Andalusian horse is descended from the Iberian horses of Spain and Portugal, and derives its name from its place of origin, the Spanish region of Andalusia.[16] Cave paintings show that horses have been present on the Iberian Peninsula as far back as 20,000 to 30,000 BCE. Although Portuguese historian Ruy d'Andrade hypothesized that the ancient Sorraia breed was an ancestor of the Southern Iberian breeds, including the Andalusian,[17] genetic studies using mitochondrial DNA show that the

Photo 12. Throughout history, the Iberian breeds have been influenced by many different peoples and cultures who occupied Spain, including the Celts, the Carthaginians, the Romans, various Germanic tribes and the Moors. The Iberian horse was identified as a talented war horse as early as 450 BCE.[4] Mitochondrial DNA studies of the modern Andalusian horse of the Iberian peninsula and Barb horse of North Africa present convincing evidence that both breeds crossed the Strait of Gibraltar and were used for b