Photography Tour of Cyprus Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Peter Shepherd

This collection represents the images captured during a recent Photography Tour of Cyprus, a small Mediterranean country rich in cultural and history and the Tour includes both Southern Cyprus (The Greek side) and Northern Cyprus (the Turkish side). This brief collection (of 12 images) covers the scenery, history, lifestyle and the archaeological treasures of Cyprus.

viewing area on the waterfront in Limassol
viewing area on the waterfront in Limassol
Greek side - Street Art, Nicosia
Greek side - Street Art, Nicosia
Abandoned house in CYPRUS, Nicosia
Abandoned house in CYPRUS, Nicosia
Old UN Border Crossing in CYPRUS, Nicosia
Old UN Border Crossing in CYPRUS, Nicosia
Border Crossing, Nicosia
Border Crossing, Nicosia
Choirokoitia Archaeological Site
Choirokoitia Archaeological Site
 The Ancient City of Salamis
The Ancient City of Salamis
Village of Lefkara famous for its Lace
Village of Lefkara famous for its Lace
Archangel Michael Church, Lefkara
Archangel Michael Church, Lefkara
Monastery at Ayia Napa, CYPRUS
Monastery at Ayia Napa, CYPRUS
Hala Sultan Teke Mosque, Larnaca Salt Lake
Hala Sultan Teke Mosque, Larnaca Salt Lake
The Agious Lazaros Church, Larnaca
The Agious Lazaros Church, Larnaca


Photography Tour of Cyprus Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. On Limassols Promenade Alley there is this viewing area on the waterfront in Limassol adjacent to the area known as Sulptures Park and which involved the beautification of the old port of Limassol. The history of Limassol (Lemesos) is largely unknown but it has been associated with the Third Crusade and therefore it is thought to have existed form the 12th Century.

Photo 2. Street Art on the Streets of Nicosia. Nicosia (Lefkosia) is the capital and seat of the government of Cyprus, and as such is the farthest southeast of all EU member states' capitals. It has been continuously inhabited for over 4,500 years and has been the capital of Cyprus since the 10th century. However, in 1963, following the crisis from 1955–64 that broke out in the city. In 1974 it became the Republic of Cyprus and Northern Cyprus.

Photo 3. Abandoned house in Nicosia. Due to the Turkish invasion in 1974, the turkisk population living on the Greek side were forced to leave their homes (and vice versa) and relocate to the Turkish side i.e. Northern Cyprus. This image represents the repercussions of the invasion in which properties (this one on the Greek side near the derelict UN Border Crossing Point) were abandoned and left to fall into a state of disrepair.

Photo 4. Old UN Border Crossing in Nicosia. The United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) was established under United Nations Security Council Resolution 186 in 1964 to prevent a recurrence of fighting following inter-communal violence between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots, to contribute to the maintenance and restoration of law and order and to facilitate a return to normal conditions and following the invasion in 1974 was utilised to patrol the United Nations Buffer Zone.

Photo 5. Border Crossing from the Greek side, Nicosia and the Ledra Street Checkpoint monument (by Theodoulos Grigoriou). The Border Crossing behind the Ledra Street Checkpoint Monument in Nicosia looking from the Greek side. Crossing over to the Turkish side involves passing through two checkpoints, one police and one Border Control. This image captures the view of the Border Crossing (accessible only by foot) from the Greek side to the Turkish side of the Country, Nicosia (Lefkosia).

Photo 6. Choirokotia is an archaeological site on the island of Cyprus dating from the Neolithic age and became a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1998. The site is known as one of the most important and best preserved prehistoric sites of the eastern Mediterranean. Much of its importance lies in the evidence of an organised functional society in the form of a collective settlement, with surrounding fortifications for communal protection.

Photo 7. The Ancient City of Salamis. Believed to be the Capital as far back as 1100BC and about 6km north of Famagusta on the Turkish side of Cyprus. Salamis was a large city in ancient times. It served many dominant groups over the course of its history, including Assyrians, Egyptians, Persians, and Romans. According to Homeric legend, Salamis was founded by archer Teucer from the Trojan War.

Photo 8. Village of Lefkara famous for its Lace. Lefkara is where the Cypriot folk needlecraft art is born - the famous “lefkaritiko” - the reputation of which stretches far beyond the frontiers of Cyprus and has become known in most of the European countries but not only there. Lefkara owes its welfare and prosperity as always spotted to this needlecraft art and to its trade launched in the late 19th century, flourishing during the 20th century first thirty years.

Photo 9. Archangel Michael Church, Lefkara. The country church of Archangel Michael (12th century) is a moderate-sized church where the Sea of Kition and Lefkara was seated in previous times (during the era of Turkish domination). Built in the Byzantine style with a dome at the south end of the village and in the midst of the community’s fields. It is not very large. Stone-made on the outside, being covered with painting of saints inside, it lacks a steeple.

Photo 10. Monastery at Ayia Napa. The charming Medieval Monastery of Agia Napa stands in the middle of the village and was built in the form of a Medieval Castle around 1500 AD. The small monastery is partially built underground and cut into the rock, surrounded by a high wall. It is dedicated to ‘Our Lady of the Forests’, with the name coming from the Ancient Greek word for wooded valley (‘Napa’) as a result of the area’s past topography.

Photo 11. Hala Sultan Teke Mosque, Larnaca Salt Lake. A Muslim shrine on the west bank of Larnaca Salt Lake, near Larnaca, Cyprus. The Hala Sultan Tekke complex is composed of a mosque, mausoleum, minaret, cemetery, and living quarters for men and women. The term tekke (convent) applies to a building designed specifically for gatherings of a Sufi brotherhood, or tariqa, and may have referred to an earlier feature of the location.

Photo 12. The Agious Lazaros Church, Larnaca. Located in the town centre, the magnificent stone church of Agios Lazaros is one of the most remarkable examples of Byzantine architecture in Cyprus and lies over the tomb of the Saint. Built by Byzantine Emperor Leo VI in the 9th century, the church was restored in the 17th century. Although the three domes and original bell tower of the church were destroyed in the first years during Ottoman rule, the gold-covered iconostasis has survived.