Chengdu Panda Base - A Day With Pandas Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Dennis Kraft

In 1987 the Chengdu Panda Base was founded with six giant pandas rescued from the wild. The Chengdu Panda Base has three stated goals: to research giant pandas, to serve as a conservation education centre, and to provide an international educational tourist destination. The beautiful Chengdu Panda Base has been highly successful. By 2008 it had 124 giant pandas. It also exhibits and educates about other endangered specimens and has international partnerships with conservation organizations

Panda 01
Panda 01
Chengdu Panda Base 01
Chengdu Panda Base 01
Bamboo 04
Bamboo 04
Panda 02
Panda 02
Panda 18
Panda 18
Panda 11
Panda 11
Panda B & W 05
Panda B & W 05
Panda 19
Panda 19
Panda 13
Panda 13
Panda 03
Panda 03
Red Panda 15
Red Panda 15
China Garden 03
China Garden 03


Chengdu Panda Base - A Day With Pandas Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Statures of Pandas at the Chengdu Giant Panda Rsearch Base in Sichuan, China. The base opened in 1987 with six pandas and has grown today to over 83. In 2009 ,the first giant pandas were born from successful artificial insemination.

Photo 2. A short distance from downtown Chengdu lies the Chengdu Panda Base a non-profit, breeding facility that was founded in 1987. Among its goals are to be a world class research facility, a conservation education centre and an international tourism destination. In addition to pandas, there are quiet bamboo lanes, a rose garden, and exhibits with other endangered Chinese animals such as the red panda and the golden monkey.

Photo 3. China is filled with beautiful parks and gardens, sometimes in the strangest of places. This photo of a bamboo covered lane was taken at the Panda Research Base in Chengdu.

Photo 4. Giant Pandas are synonymous with China and are beloved around the world. The scientific name for the giant panda is Ailuropoda melanoleuca. They have a distant cousin, the red panda which in many respects is a bit closer in similarity to a racoon. Giant pandas come from South and West China in a few mountainous and heavily forested areas. 'Panda' is an English name (borrowed from the French) and in China they are called daxiongma.

Photo 5. Pandas are normally solitary although the territories of up to seven pandas may slightly overlap and the pandas will communicate with each other through scent deposits. These two juveniles are about a year old and share enclosure with a number of other youngsters at the Chengdu Panda Research Base.

Photo 6. Pandas will typically live 20 years in the wild and 30 years in captivity.

Photo 7. Black and white of a panda in.a tree at Chengdu Panda Research Base.

Photo 8. Pandas are synonymous with China and are beloved around the world.

Photo 9. This is a yearling panda wandering through its enclosure at the Chengdu Panda Research station.

Photo 10. Pandas eat constantly. On average about half of the day is spent eating and the pandas favourite food is bamboo. An adult male panda may eat between 9 and 14 Kgs of bamboo in a single day.

Photo 11. Red Pandas (Ailurus fulgens) are distantly related to giant pandas and are closer to racoons. They are generally nocturnal, solitary animals living mainly on bamboo but are also omnivores. There are believed to be less than 10,000 red pandas living in the forests of Asia.

Photo 12. China is filled with beautiful parks and gardens, sometimes in the strangest of places. This photo of a rose covered trellis was taken in the Rose Garden at the Panda Research Base in Chengdu.