Burrard Inlet on the West Coast of Canada Proofsheet

A Photo Gallery By Dennis Kraft

Burrard Inlet is a coastal fjord in South Western British Columbia formed in the last ice age. It is the home of the indigenous Musquem, Tsielil-wautu and Squamish peoples and has been continuously inhabited for thousands of years. The area is rich in wildlife and the waters are used by commercial and recreational boaters making it environmentally controversial.

Burrard Inlet Maritime Waters
Burrard Inlet Maritime Waters
Sea Kayaker at Burrard Inlet
Sea Kayaker at Burrard Inlet
Harbour Seal Sunning Itself
Harbour Seal Sunning Itself
Kayaking in Burrard Inlet 02
Kayaking in Burrard Inlet 02
Harbour Seals On a Log Boom
Harbour Seals On a Log Boom
Sailboats in Burrard Inlet 01
Sailboats in Burrard Inlet 01
Burrard Inlet Tugboat
Burrard Inlet Tugboat
Pier at Burrard Inlet.jpg
Pier at Burrard Inlet.jpg
Burrard Inlet Boating
Burrard Inlet Boating
Sailboats at Burrard Inlet 01
Sailboats at Burrard Inlet 01
Empty Pier at Rocky Point
Empty Pier at Rocky Point
Burrard Inlet Romance B & W
Burrard Inlet Romance B & W


Burrard Inlet on the West Coast of Canada Details

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Caption List:

Photo 1. Burrard Inlet is a coastal fjord separating the City of Vancouver and the North Shore mountain communities of West and North Vancouver. It is the home of the indigenous Musquem, Tsielil-wautu and Squamish peoples and has been continuously inhabited for thousands of years. It extends from the Straits of Georgia 25 km, almost due East to Port Moody and there is a connecting mountainous fjord known as Indian Arm that extends Northward another 20 km.

Photo 2. A kayaker looks towards a petroleum refinery storage area. Burrard inlets mouth includes English Bay and the Port of Vancouver which is the most active port in Canada. This area is shared by recreational and commercial interests.

Photo 3. The inlet is home to a healthy population of harbour seals who take advantage of docks and log booms to sun themselves.

Photo 4. Burrard Inlet is a well protected and relatively shallow harbour that is shared by commercial and residential interests in the area. It is ideal for kayaking, sailing and fishing..

Photo 5. RThese Pacific harbour seals ( Phoca vitulina richardsi) are sunning themselves on a log boom in Burrard Inlet near Vancouver, Canada. Harbour seals are the most common of all temperate water seals. The adults may reach a length of 1.6 to 1.9 metres in length and weight from 60 to 120 kg.

Photo 6. A group of sailboats belonging to a local sailing school glide through the calm waters of Burrard Inlet.

Photo 7. A tugboat plies its way through the waters of Burrard Inlet. Seaspan tugboats accompany oil tankers in and out of the inlet and through the majority of the Georgia Strait after loading oil at a nearby refinery. The tugboats add significantly to the protection of the beloved waterway.

Photo 8. The pier at Rocky Point. is a popular municipal park in Port Moody. The pier is used for boat launches, and the area has businesses that include restaurants, an ice cream shop, and kayak rentals. In the evenings locals and tourists alike wander down to enjoy the sunsets and the quiet waters of Burrard Inlet.

Photo 9. Two kayakers in a double kayak paddle in Burrard Inlet near Rocky point. The waters are shared by recreational boaters and commercial traffic.

Photo 10. At the end of the day, sailboats of a local sailing school, line a dock, at Rocky Point in Burrard Inlet.

Photo 11. A pier is silhouetted against the orange waters of Burrard Inlet. Forest fires raging across the province have filled the air with smoke that diffuses the light.

Photo 12. A romantic couple sit in the fading light of the day looking out on Burrard Inlet.